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Taliban Continuously Violated Women’s Rights Under Their Rule, Says Amnesty International

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On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Amnesty International has said that the Taliban started a new era of human rights abuse and violations since taking over on 15 August 2021.

In the statement published today November 25, it is stated that the de facto Taliban authorities have violated their promise of protecting Afghan people’s rights, especially women rights, and have resumed the cycle of violence.

According to this statement, the Taliban have systematically dismantled key institutions for the protection of human rights and suppressed freedom of expression, fair trial and other rights over the past year.

“The fundamental rights of women and girls have been stripped. Thousands of Afghans have been arbitrarily detained, tortured, disappeared, and even killed. Journalists, activists, human rights defenders, artists, academics, religious and ethnic minorities remain at particular risk.”, the statement reads.

However, in this statement, Amnesty International called on the Taliban authorities to end “gross human rights violations” taking place in Afghanistan, including reprisal killings and attacks on ethnic and religious minorities, women and girls, LGBTI people, human rights defenders, civil society members, judges, lawyers, former government officials, journalists, and others.

The Taliban have also been asked to restore the women and girls rights, including access to education, re-opening all schools and universities, ensuring access to health care and allowing women to return to work. The statement also states that the Taliban must guarantee the rights of all Afghan people including freedom of expression and freedom of association.

At the end of Amnesty International’s statement, it is emphasized on the creation of an effective and transparent investigation and accountability mechanism that will deliver justice to everyone through fair trials without recourse to the death penalty.

The 16-day campaign against violence against women has started today, while the women of Afghanistan have gone through difficult days and nights for more than a year since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August 2021.

The 16-day campaign against violence against women has started today, while the women of Afghanistan have gone through difficult days and nights for more than a year since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August 2021.

Since the Taliban’s return to power, the group has imposed severe restrictions on women and girls. Currently, girls above the sixth grade are not allowed to go to school, and female employees can no longer work in government offices. These restrictions have forced women to start protest rallies but the group’s de-facto regime, however, has violently dispersed these protests in different parts of the country.

However, the Office of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) has recently called on the de facto Taliban authorities to take immediate steps to end violence against women and the broader deterioration of women’s rights as a vital part of efforts to establish a meaningful and sustainable peace.